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The Uberfication of the University (Open access Forerunners series version available here; as of April 4 2017 an interactive Manifold series version is available here.)

Públicos Fantasma - La Naturaleza Política Del Libro - La Red (Mexico: Taller de Ediciones Económicas, 2016) - new book, co-authored with Andrew Murphie, Janneke Adema and Alessandro Ludovico. 

'Posthumanities: The Dark Side of "The Dark Side of the Digital"' (with Janneke Adema), in Janneke Adema and Gary Hall, eds, Disrupting the Humanities: Towards Posthumanities, Journal of Electronic PublishingVol. 9, No.2, Winter, 2016.

'Pirate Philosophy And Post-Capitalism: A Conversation With Gary Hall', by Mark Carrigan, The Sociological Imagination, December 8, 2016.

Open Access

Most of Gary's work is freely available to read and download either here in Media Gifts or in Coventry University's online repository CURVE here 

performative project Janneke Adema has put together, based on our ‘The Political Nature of the Book: On Artists’ Books and Radical Open Access’ article for New Formations, Number 78, Summer, 2013. 

'What Does Academia.edu's Success Mean for Open Access: The Data-Driven World of Search Engines and Social Networking', Ctrl-Z: New Media Philosophy, no.5, 2015.

Radical Open Access network

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Wednesday
Aug012012

Paying attention: new issue of Culture Machine

CULTURE MACHINE 13 (2012)
http://www.culturemachine.net/index.php/cm/issue/current

PAYING ATTENTION
edited by Patrick Crogan and Samuel Kinsley

How are the ways we understand subjective experience – not least cognitively – being modulated by political economic rationales? And how might artists, cultural theorists, social scientists and radical philosophers learn to respond – analytically, creatively, methodologically and politically – to the commodification of human capacities of attention? This special issue of Culture Machine explores these interlinked questions as a way of building upon and opening out contemporary research concerning the economisation of cognitive capacities. It proposes a contemporary critical re-focussing on the politics, ethics and aesthetics of the ‘attention economy’, a notion developed in the 1990s by scholars such as Jonathan Beller, Michael Goldhaber and Georg Franck.

Contents

Patrick Crogan, Samuel Kinsley, ‘Paying Attention: Towards a Critique of the Attention Economy’

Bernard Stiegler, ‘Relational Ecology and the Digital Pharmakon’

Tiziana Terranova, ‘Attention, Economy and the Brain’

Jonathan Beller, ‘Wagers Within the Image: Rise of Visuality, Transformation of Labour, Aesthetic Regimes’

Samuel Kinsley, ‘Towards Peer-to-Peer Alternatives: An Interview with Michel Bauwens’

Sy Taffel, ‘Escaping Attention: Digital Media Hardware, Materiality and Ecological Cost’

Ben Roberts, ‘Attention-seeking: Technics, Publics and Software Individuation’

Taina Bucher, ‘A Technicity of Attention: How Software “Makes Sense”’

Martyn Thayne, ‘Friends Like Mine: The Production of Socialised Subjectivity in the Attention Economy’

Rolien Hoyng, ‘Popping Up and Fading Out: Participatory Networks and Istanbul’s Creative City Project’

Bjarke Liboriussen, ‘Second Life: Message (to Professionals), Attention! Economic Bubble (to the Rest of Us)’

Bjarke Liboriussen, Ursula Plesner, ‘Current Architectural Use of Virtual Worlds’

Ruth Catlow, ‘We Won’t Fly for Art: Media Art Ecologies’

Constance Fleuriot, ‘Avoiding Vapour Trails in the Virtual Cloud: Developing Ethical Design Questions for Pervasive Media Producers’

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